How to Use Adwords for Online Marketing

Now that you’ve read my previous posts, you know the basics of online marketing and your website has been updated to convert visitors into customers. The next step is to learn how to use AdWords (Google’s online advertising program)

[Image & content source: Google]

How AdWords Works

Your ad can appear when someone searches for terms related to your product or service, or when they’re on a website with content related to your business. How does this work?

Learn The ABCs of AdWords

Learn how online advertising can help attract new customers to your business. This video describes how the opportunities available with organic and paid search can get your website in front of interested people. Start off right with Your Guide to AdWords: https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/6080949 Subscribe to AdWords Help on YouTube http://www.youtube.com/learnwithgoogle.

Keywords connect you with customers

Keywords are words or phrases you choose when you set up your AdWords campaign. These are terms you think your potential customers are likely to use when searching for products or services like yours.

By matching your keywords with the ads you create, you make it possible for your ad to show when someone searches for similar terms, or visits a website with related content.

For example, if you deliver fresh flowers, you could use fresh flower delivery as one keyword paired with an ad promoting fresh flower delivery. When someone searches Google using the phrase fresh flower delivery or a similar term, your ad might appear next to Google search results, or on other websites related to fresh flower delivery.

The AdWords Ad Auction

So how does AdWords determine which ads should show? It all happens with a lightning-fast ad auction, which takes place every time someone searches on Google or visits a site that shows AdWords ads.

AdWords calculate a score, called Ad Rank, for every ad in the auction. Ad Rank determines your ad position and whether your ads are eligible to show at all. The ad with the highest Ad Rank gets to show in the top position, and so on. Your Ad Rank has three factors:

Your bid – When you set your bid, you’re telling AdWords the maximum amount you’re willing to pay for a click on your ad. How much you actually end up paying is often less, and you can change your bid at any time.

The quality of your ads – AdWords also looks at how relevant and useful your ad and the website it links to are to the person who’ll see it. Our assessment of the quality of your ad is summarized in your Quality Score, which you can monitor—and work to improve—in your AdWords account.

The expected impact from your ad extensions and other ad formats – When you create your ad, you have the option to add additional information to your ad, such as a phone number, or more links to specific pages on your site. These are called ad extensions. AdWords estimates how extensions and other ad formats you use will impact your ad’s performance.

What do you pay?

With cost-per-click (CPC) bidding, you’re charged only when someone is interested enough to click your ad and go to your website. You tell AdWords the most you’re willing to pay for a click on your ad (called the maximum cost-per-click bid), but you could be charged less.

You have control over your AdWords budget. You decide the average amount you want to spend each day. On the days when your ad is more popular, AdWords will allow up to 20% more of your average daily budget so you won’t miss out on those valuable clicks. But don’t worry, we’ll lower your maximum budget on other days so that, over the course of a month, your overall spend will average out to the limit you’ve set (assuming your campaign runs for the full month).

Now you know how AdWords works. If you have questions please use the comments section below or contact us for a free AdWords consultation.

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